It's Monday! What Are You Reading?


This weekly meme is hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

A very quiet week for me reading wise. Only one book finished, but what a great read it was. So pleased that Tracy Rees followed up her very successful debut novel, Amy Snow, with the equally enthralling Florence Grace. I can't wait to see what she writes next.

As you can gather, I abandoned what I was currently reading in favour of Florence Grace,  but I'm heading back to those books this week and hopefully will stick to my plan to read  No Man's Land and The Spirit Guide next.

What I Read Last Week

Florence Grace by Tracy Rees

Florrie Buckley is an orphan, living on the wind-blasted moors of Cornwall. It's a hard existence but Florrie is content; she runs wild in the mysterious landscape. She thinks her destiny is set in stone.
But when Florrie is fourteen, she inherits a never-imagined secret. She is related to a wealthy and notorious London family, the Graces. Overnight, Florrie's life changes and she moves from country to city, from poverty to wealth.
Cut off from everyone she has ever known, Florrie struggles to learn the rules of this strange new world. And then she must try to fathom her destructive pull towards the enigmatic and troubled Turlington Grace, a man with many dark secrets of his own.


What I'm Still Reading

All For Nothing by Walter Kempowski

Winter, January 1945. It is cold and dark, and the German army is retreating from the Russian advance. Germans are fleeing the occupied territories in their thousands, in cars and carts and on foot. But in a rural East Prussian manor house, the wealthy von Globig family tries to seal itself off from the world. Peter von Globig is twelve, and feigns a cough to get out of his Hitler Youth duties, preferring to sledge behind the house and look at snowflakes through his microscope. His father Eberhard is stationed in Italy - a desk job safe from the front - and his bookish and musical mother Katharina has withdrawn into herself. Instead the house is run by a conservative, frugal aunt, helped by two Ukrainian maids and an energetic Pole. Protected by their privileged lifestyle from the deprivation and chaos around them, and caught in the grip of indecision, they make no preparations to leave, until Katharina's decision to harbour a stranger for the night begins their undoing. Superbly expressive and strikingly vivid, sympathetic yet painfully honest about the motivations of its characters, All for Nothing is a devastating portrait of the self-delusions, complicities and denials of the German people as the Third Reich comes to an end.

Island of the Swans by Ciji Ware

In this resplendent love story a dazzling era comes vividly to life as one woman's passionate struggle to follow her heart takes her from the opulent cotillions of Edinburgh to the London court of half-mad King George III . . . from a famed salon teeming with politicians and poets to a picturesque castle on the secluded, lush Island of the Swans. . . .
Best friends in childhood, Jane Maxwell and Thomas Fraser wreaked havoc on the cobbled streets of Edinburgh with their juvenile pranks. But years later, when Jane blossoms into a beautiful woman, her feelings for Thomas push beyond the borders of friendship, and he becomes the only man she wants. When Thomas is reportedly killed in the American colonies, the handsome, charismatic Alexander, Duke of Gordon, appeals to a devastated Jane. Believing Thomas is gone forever, Jane hesitantly responds to the Duke, whose passion ignites her blood, even as she rebels at his fierce desire to claim her.
But Thomas Fraser is not dead, and when he returns to find his beloved Jane betrothed to another, he refuses to accept the heartbreaking turn of events. Soon Jane's marriage is swept into a turbulent dance of tender wooing and clashing wills--as Alex seeks truly to make her his, and his alone. . . .

 
What I Hope to Read Next

No Man's Land by Simon Tolkien

From the slums of London to the riches of an Edwardian country house; from the hot, dark seams of a Yorkshire coalmine to the exposed terrors of the trenches, Adam Raine’s journey from boy to man is set against the backdrop of a society violently entering the modern world.
Adam Raine is a boy cursed by misfortune. His impoverished childhood in the slums of Islington is brought to an end by a tragedy that sends him north to Scarsdale, a hard-living coalmining town where his father finds work as a union organizer. But it isn’t long before the escalating tensions between the miners and their employer, Sir John Scarsdale, explode with terrible consequences.
In the aftermath, Adam meets Miriam, the Rector’s beautiful daughter, and moves into Scarsdale Hall, an opulent paradise compared with the life he has been used to before. But he makes an enemy of Sir John’s son, Brice, who subjects him to endless petty cruelties for daring to step above his station.
When love and an Oxford education beckon, Adam feels that his life is finally starting to come together – until the outbreak of war threatens to tear everything apart.


The Spirit Guide by Elizabeth Davies

Seren has an unusual gift – she sees spirits, the shades of the dead.
Terrified of being accused of witchcraft, a very real possibility in twelfth century Britain, she keeps her secret close, not even confiding in her husband.

But when she gives her heart and soul to a man who guides spirits in the world beyond the living, she risks her secret and her life for their love.

13 comments:

  1. The Spirit Guide looks interesting. I do enjoy books about witchcraft and spirits. Enjoy reading this week!


    My It's Monday! What Are You Reading? post.

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    1. It does look interesting. I'm looking forward to reading it.

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  2. I like it when a book grabs me and won't let go. Other books can wait. Come see what my week was like here. Happy reading!

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    1. I was hoping this would happen with Florence Grace as I'd enjoyed Amy Snow so much - and it did!

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  3. I enjoyed Florence Grace when I read it, so evocative of place.

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  4. Oh, Florence Grace looks like a book I would enjoy. The Cornwall setting is one I enjoy. Thanks for sharing...and for visiting my blog. Thanks for the tip on Doc Martin and Kingdom. I'm going to look for them.

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    1. It was a lovely book. I hope you get to read it.

      If you like a Cornwall setting, you'll probably enjoy Doc Martin as it is set and filmed in Cornwall.

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  5. Florence Grace looks like a very good read, and my husband watches Doc Martin, which I see you recommended above. I need to read this and watch that :) Thanks!

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    1. Florence Grace was very good. I hope you get around to reading it and watching Doc Martin!

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  6. Florence Grace and The Spirit Guide both look really good! I have not read Amy Snow either, it sounds like I need to read that too. :)

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  7. Florence Grace and The Spirit Guide both look really good! I have not read Amy Snow either, it sounds like I need to read that too. :)

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